The old nursery rhyme is brought brilliantly to life in a colonial setting ... It just gets better with each rereading.

The old nursery rhyme is brought brilliantly to life in a colonial setting ... It just gets better with each rereading.

The House that Jack Built

$19.99$29.99

This is the dog
That worried the cat
That killed the rat
That ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

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  • Description

    This is the dog
    That worried the cat
    That killed the rat
    That ate the malt
    That lay in the house that Jack built.

    “The House that Jack Built is a book with two strands. The main rhythmic text, based on the well-known rhyme, tells the story  of Jack Bull, who travels to New Zealand from London as a new settler in 1798.

    “The detailed contemporary illustrations … tell the story from a Maori perspective—beginning with the myth of creation: Papatuanuku the earth mother, Ranginui the sky father and their children as guardians of the land. As the story goes on and Jack’s house grows, Papatuanuku is shown in the illustrations to weaken and fade.

    “This story holds a poignant environmental as well as cultural  message and is a thought-provoking insight into the founding of  New Zealand by the Europeans.”
    (from www.picturebooks.co.nz)


  • Book Details

    Country of Origin New Zealand
    Reader Age 5-7 year, 6-8 year
    Book Size
    ISBN

  • Reviews

    1. Widge Reviews, July 2012

      The rhyme would appeal to young children while the messages in the artwork of this book speak of politics and even touch on religion for older children and adults to explore.

    2. Around the Bookshops, May 2012

      There are many hours of ideas and sub-stories to explore here … the publisher describes [this tale] as the story of our modern history.

    3. The Children’s Bookshop School and Library Newsletter, Term 1 2012

      Bishop’s multi-layered story of our colonial history … tells the story of Jack Bull … as a new settler in 1798. But the second story is in the striking illustrations as Bishop weaves in the Maori perspective, showing their spiritual commitment to their land and pressure from the settlers to acquire it.

    4. Swings and Roundabouts, June 2012

      A definite must for all early childhood centres. The illustrations … reminded me of Australian author Jeannie Baker and her environmental story Window, with its poignant environmental and cultural message.

    5. parentsintouch.co.uk

      It is a fascinating look into Maori culture and will bring a whole new meaning to the story.

    6. Saturday Express, June 2012

      The House that Jack Built is a complex weaving together of the nursery rhyme with the cultural, historical and environmental context. It’s not a quick read, to barrel through it one would miss so much. It’s rather a thought-provoking book to savour, discuss and debate, and revisit with your family.

    7. Trevor Agnew, Magpies, March 2012

      There is pleasure to be found at many levels in this splendid book…The House That Jack Built was selected as a NZ Post Book of the Year at the end of last century, and now seems destined to become one of the important books of the 21st Century.

    8. The Listener (Arts and Books), March 2012

      The old nursery rhyme is brought brilliantly to life in a colonial setting, based on Bishop’s own whakapapa, wrapping indigenous myth in both word and pattern around traditional English text, drawing parallels between animals of myth and those brought by the Pakeha, and showing the blossoming of love between Bishop’s redheaded Scottish ancestor and the Maori ‘maiden all forlorn’. It just gets better with each rereading.

    9. Radio Southland, February 2012

      I have now found my children’s favourite New Zealand book. A big call I know. Especially when they are only 3 years old and 6 years old. But I feel that I can confidently predict that we won’t ever find a more beautiful book that will keep their interest for years to come as they discover the different layers within the book…This is a really important book with a very important story.


  • Reviews

    1. SammyD

      This is an absolutely beautiful book. The text is the well known, repeating story about Jack building his house. But the illustrations are amazing – starting with Jack in London and telling the story of his arrival in late 18th centure NZ, meeting a Maori girl and marrying her. The hard cover book is worth the additional price as it has extra illustrations. Maori language and motif’s and the relationship between European and Maori are throughout the book. It really is a book that will be passed down through the generations.

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