Q&As

The Uprising: Q&A with Eirlys Hunter

Portrait of Eirlys Hunter

As a child I was obsessed with the idea of flying and of seeing the world from above. That was related to my passion for maps—and of books with maps in.

Koro/Pops and Mihi: Q&A with Gavin Bishop

In their own way these ‘little’ books are as challenging as the much bigger books I’ve been doing in recent years. They don’t take as long because they don’t

Being translated: both terrifying and relaxing

For Women in Translation month we asked Swedish writer Frida Nilsson about the translation process. Nilsson’s new book released in English is Hattie and Olaf, one of over a dozen novels she has written for children which have been published around the world. The Ice Sea Pirates, her most translated book, is available in 20… Read more »

The Tiny Woman’s Coat: Q&A with Joy Cowley

Joy Cowley portrait

Joy Cowley is one of New Zealand’s best-loved writers for children and adults, with an international reputation. She has won a multitude of awards and honours for her bestselling books, including the Prime Minister’s Award for contribution to literature. She was shortlisted for the Hans Christian Andersen Award in 2018.         What… Read more »

Leilong the Library Bus: Q&A with Julia Liu & Bei Lynn

Bei Lynn

The image of the small girl and the big dinosaur, the idea that something could be so gigantic, struck my young mind. I still remember the feeling back then of my heart pounding fast. Since then, I have become addicted to reading about these worlds that are far away in time or space but real to me.

A Mother Is a House: Q&A with Aurore Petit

Aurore Petit

This book is completely autobiographical. It tells of my son’s first year and my first year of being a mother. It is a book I wrote so I wouldn’t forget that year and also to try to convey what I experienced when discovering motherhood.

Inside the Suitcase: Q&A with Clotilde Perrin

Portrait of Clotilde Perrin

While I was making the book, I had the image of a small child playing in his room with a small basket, creating a wacky adventure with the random objects he comes across. So I wanted a little man with a suitcase—that simple!

Where Is the Dragon?: Q&A with Leo Timmers

Portrait of Leo Timmers

The story emerged from these drawings. After struggling for months, I suddenly had the whole story finished in an hour. Pure magic, and very thrilling. You just never know which new idea is around the corner.

Timeline Science and Technology: Q&A with Peter Goes

Peter Goes Gecko Press

I wanted to make an up-to-date version of a timeline because at school, timelines helped me a great deal to understand history. Those simple lines with dates and pictures gave me a better overview and understanding of history than text. It is a way to create order in a sometimes-chaotic string of events. It helps you see similarities, influences and coincidences.