it does more than merely provide the facts; it’s also a celebration of life and of difference

Red Reading Hub

How Do You Make a Baby?

$32.99

How Do You Make a Baby? is a funny and factual resource about an eternally relevant topic.

Written by Anna Fiske

Translated by Don Bartlett

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ISBN: HowDoYouMakeaBaby Categories: , ,

  • Description

    In How Do You Make a Baby? Anna Fiske answers the questions all children are curious about: How does a baby get into the mother’s stomach? Who can make a baby, and how is it actually done?
    With comic illustrations and a playful tone, this is a funny and factual book about an eternally relevant topic, giving parents and children a starting point for discussion.
    Informational, funny and warm, How Do You Make a Baby?  is suitable for children aged 4 and up.


  • Book Details

    Country of Origin Norway
    Reader Age 5-7 year, 6-8 year
    Book Size
    ISBN

  • Reviews

    1. The School Librarian

      A difficult topic, well tackled, and a useful addition to the primary school library.

    2. Manhattan Book Review

      5 stars. This book by Anna Fiske is an excellent teaching tool and conversation starter for this tricky topic…This book is fantastically inclusive

    3. The Horn Book

      The drawings maintain a sense of humor while introducing forthright details about intercourse…This covers-off look at baby-making doesn’t leave much to the imagination, and those seeking an uninhibited approach to the topic will welcome this book’s directness.

    4. School Reading List

      A no-nonsense and refreshingly unsubtle non fiction book to show primary aged children how babies are made. The cartoon style illustrations are unabashed and a diverse range of loving relationships are depicted. Ideal for responsible discussion with KS2 children learning the new sex education element of the national curriculum.

    5. School Library Journal

      An informational and fun treatment of what can be a difficult subject. Readers will appreciate the humor and straightforward presentation. Recommended for general purchase.

    6. Armadillo Magazine

      With comic-style illustration and a playful tone here are facts on a topic that is eternally relevant and always a challenge to tackle!

    7. Dr Mary Roche, Just Imagine

      The title question is comprehensively answered in a straightforward manner. Playful images lighten the heavy load of information…The book will be invaluable to parents who want to answer their child’s questions as honestly as possible.

    8. The Bookbag

      It’s factually correct and there’s rather more information than you might expect in an 80-page book which is mainly illustrations…It’s all very matter of fact. There are numerous opportunities for discussion…I think the tone of the book is best described as ‘playful’ and whilst it might be pointed out that this is a serious subject, ‘playful’ is far better than ‘patronising’ or ‘incomprehensible’ from the child’s point of view…it’s Gecko Press, so production values are high. This is a substantial hardback: it’s going to stand a lot of handling and the chances are that it’s a book which a child will want to discuss with an adult and then read alone, probably on several occasions.

    9. Red Reading Hub

      …it does more than merely provide the facts; it’s also a celebration of life and of difference…Anna Fiske’s book offers a great starting place for conversations about birth, sex, and families with children from around 4+.

    10. Kirkus

      Finally: a “where do babies come from” book that doesn’t mince words—or pictures. This frank, cartoon-illustrated picture book answers its titular question with Scandinavian directness…The text’s mild cheekiness balances the informational load and should ease shared read-alouds in families unaccustomed to this book’s straightforwardness. Answers an often difficult question with humor and even grace.

    11. NZ Poetry Box

      This is the most brilliant, moving, informative children’s book on how to make babies that I have ever read! It is inclusive and witty and contains plain facts, but is so much more than more than plain facts…I love this book. I would have loved sharing it with my children when they were young.


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