Natty little hardback about the joys of simplicity

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Selma

$14.99

Selma is asked: What is happiness? She says: Happiness is eating a little grass at sunrise, playing with the children until lunchtime, a little exercise after lunch, a little more grass…

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  • Product Description

    Selma is asked: What is happiness? She says: Happiness is eating a little grass at sunrise, playing with the children until lunchtime, a little exercise after lunch, a little more grass, a chat with her neighbour Mrs Miller in the evening and then a lovely long sleep.

    And if she had more time? She would eat a little grass, play with her children until lunchtime, do a little exercise after lunch, eat a little more grass, have a chat with her neighbour Mrs Miller in the evening and then have a lovely long sleep.

    And if she won a million dollars? She would eat a little grass, play with her children, do a little exercise…

    Publisher Julia Marshall says: “This is a beautiful little book about what is important. Jutta Bauer has created a big character in Selma, in just a few words and a few simple water colours—this book always makes people smile. It is the perfect book to give to friends and mothers—and children love it.”


  • Book Details

    Country of Origin Germany
    Book Size
    ISBN

  • Reviews

    1. :

      Selma is a sheep who has found a universal truth – happiness comes from being satisfied with very little. All she wants is to eat grass, play with her children, exercise a little, talk to friends and sleep deeply at night. ‘And if you won a million dollars?’ asks a reporter. All I want to do is to eat grass, play with…
      A very small book with a very large message for both children and (overstressed) adults, illustrated with affectionately humorous drawings.

    2. :

      Small hardback about the meaning of happiness, as illustrated by Selma, a sheep who, given more time and money, would live out her days exactly as she does now. Lively watercolour illustrations add to its considerable charm.

    3. :

      Small hardback about the meaning of happiness, as illustrated by Selma, a sheep who, given more time and money, would live out her days exactly as she does now. Lively watercolour illustrations add to its considerable charm. 6+.

    4. :

      Selma is a gorgeous, gorgeous small picture book that had my children in hysterics! Translated from the original German, a jaded dog goes to the wise ram to ask ‘What is happiness?’ The ram tells the story of Selma, a sheep who knows how simple happiness can be.
      A philosophical tale with a healthy dose of quiet humour, this appealed to our whole household (probably on several different levels). High quality production and the universal appeal of sweet Selma make this book a delightful addition to a bookshelf or coffee table.

    5. :

      Selma is a really really funny book.
      It is about a sheep called Selma who was asked what she would do if she had more time and won a million dollars – no matter what changed in her life she said she’d like to do the same things The things she liked doing were to eat a little grass in the morning, play with her children until lunch, have some exercise in the afternoon, talk with Mrs Miller in the evening and finally fall fast asleep. She was very happy with her life.
      I loved this book, and have read it lots of times. It’s easy to read in bed because it’s so little. I would recommend this book to readers of all ages.

    6. :

      Sweet and simple ‘HAPPINESS? Let me tell you the story of Selma?’
      Sweet, simple and beautifully produced, this book is a soothing solution to the search for happiness. Selma is a sheep, with an appealing simplicity to her philosophy. I loved it. For all ages’.

    7. :

      With a motto of ‘curiously good books from around the world’ New Zealand’s Gecko Press introduces Kiwis to the best of modern European literature for the young. Gecko’s output continues to be splendid as their latest quartet proves.

      ‘What is happiness?’ A German sheep called Selma has the answer. At sunrise she eats a little grass, plays with her children until lunchtime, exercises in the afternoon, eats some more grass, has a little chat with Mrs Miller (a vulture!) in the evening and then falls asleep.
      Selma is a delightful little parable of motherhood which will have two groups of reader: young children and their mothers. Selma is destined to be a popular little book for mothers of all ages. Nine–99

    8. :

      ‘Three ‘curiously good’ children’s books’

      Selma is a little gift book from Germany about a sheep who has discovered the art of happiness, a book that feels made for New Zealand.
      All of these [Selma, Who’s Driving? and My friend Percy and the Sheik] are curiously different, beautifully illustrated and with great storylines and messages.

    9. :

      It’s a delightful story and I’ll share it with people on holiday and introduce ‘selma’ the verb into my conversation. ‘I’m going to selma this afternoon’, etc.

    10. :

      ‘The best in recent picture books.’
      Jutta Bauer’s Selma is a natty little hardback about the joys of simplicity, as expounded by a sagacious sheep. Wise and quietly hilarious; parents may find this a book worth pondering in the midst of the Christmas frazzle.

    11. :

      This was one of those rare finds – flipping through the pages in a toy store while the Christmas rush bustled behind me, I stood reading with a serene smile on my face. I immediately bought all copies, and ordered more for all my friends. This is not a children’s book, it is a mother’s book, which serves to bring us the perspective we sometimes need in our busy lives.

    12. :

      Cannily released just in time for Christmas, Selma will be cropping up in stockings across the country. Inoffensively gimmicky and appealingly produced, it presents a sheep called Selma who is so satisfied with her simple routine of eating grass, playing with her children and sleeping that she wouldn’t change a thing if offered more time or $1 million. While reviewers in the States have proclaimed it ‘a mother’s book, which serves to bring us the perspective we sometimes need in our busy lives’, I’d imagine a harassed parent, who can’t remember what `a nice long sleep’ feels like, would be more likely to find it smugly irrelevant to them, being about a sheep who doesn’t have to juggle a career and screaming children, and whose food grows in front of her. But then I’m not a mother. Evidently a satisfied sheep hits the spot for some of them.

    13. :

      What is happiness? When the wise old ram is asked this question, he tells the story of Selma. At sunrise she eats a little grass, plays with her children until lunchtime, exercises in the afternoon, eats some more grass, has a little chat with Mrs Miller in the evening and then falls fast asleep. When an interviewer asks Selma what she would do if she had more time, her reply begins, Well, I would eat a little grass at sunrise, play with my children until lunchtime… Gleeful cartoons show the routine that Selma sees as the secret of satisfaction with her simple life.
      Although it is light-hearted and joyous, Selma does have a dark side. Her friend Mrs Miller is actually a vulture and sharp-eyed readers will also spot a fox lurking. Yet Selma enjoys her life. When asked what she would do if she won a million dollars, her reply begins, Well, I would eat a little grass at sunrise, play with my children until lunchtime…
      Selma is a lovely parable of contentment, which will ring a delighted echo from the hearts of mothers of all ages. Of course Selma is a children’s book but, just as that other all-ages classic, Donkeys, became a standard silver wedding gift, Selma is going to be a popular gift for Mother’s Day.


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